“They are extremely cute. They appear to be little teddy bears,” stated Kara Ingraham, animal keeper for small mammals on the National Zoo. “They’re so cute and appear to be little fluff balls.”

WTOP’s Dick Uliano introduces us to the National Zoo’s new pygmy gradual loris infants.

At the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, two brown, fuzzy infants with large spherical eyes belonging to an endangered species have been born in the Small Mammal House.

“They are extremely cute. They appear to be little teddy bears,” stated Kara Ingraham, animal keeper for small mammals on the National Zoo. “They’re so cute and appear to be little fluff balls.”

The infants, born March 21, are pygmy gradual lorises.

Small Mammal House keepers cradle two pygmy gradual loris infants of their arms. (Courtesy Kara Ingraham/Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute)

“They’re a positively distinctive and never well-known animal. The gradual loris is a sort of prosimian, so it’s a primate,” Ingraham stated. “They are native to Asia … to Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia and China.”

The pygmy gradual loris is a nocturnal creature, so to imitate their pure habitat, they’re stored within the darkened space of the Small Mammal House.

Zookeepers say the infants look like robust and wholesome, and the perfect time to see them once they’re energetic is throughout late mornings and early afternoons.

The cute and fuzzy critters even have a stunning attribute.

“The factor that everybody is at all times shocked to find out about them is that they’re a venomous primate, gradual lorises are the one identified venomous primates,” Ingraham stated.

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